Who we are

Working Landscapes is a nonprofit rural development organization based in Warren County, NC. We are working to advance the economic and environmental resilience of our region.  Learn more about our mission and vision>

In order to grow the economy and improve health in northeastern North Carolina, we work with partners to build a food system that connects local farmers to local consumers. We have developed a unique food processing hub in downtown Warrenton.

Are you a food service professional?  We offer a line of premium quality, fresh-cut local greens for your cafeteria.  Learn more>

Are you a farmer?  We can help you enter wholesale markets.  Learn more>

Are you a food entrepreneur?  Launch or grow your business in our shared-use commercial kitchen.  Learn more>

Are you a school district?  We can help you get students engaged in healthy, local eating.  Learn more>

Latest Updates

Landowners, please consider signing up for this valuable workshop:

On Saturday, May 18, 2019, the Land Loss Prevention Project (LLPP), a statewide non-profit law firm, will provide a workshop on heir property, its challenges, and the importance of wills and other advance planning documents. The event will take place on the Vance-Granville Community College Main Campus in Henderson, N.C., and will be held in Civic Center Seminar Room 2 in Building 9. Please see directions and the Main Campus map below. The event will begin at 11:30 a.m. and run until 1:30 p.m. A light lunch and refreshments will be provided by the LLPP. If you are interested in attending, please email dawn@landloss.org. See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

Working Landscapes was honored to be one of six North Carolina food ventures featured at yesterday’s Thrive NC Summit in Raleigh! Gabe told the story of our local food processing initiatives and the importance of building regional food infrastructure. Then he was on a panel with our long-time collaborator Alice Ammerman of UNC. #GoThriveNC See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

 

Comment on Facebook

Thank you so much for your great work in Warren County and beyond!

You surely represent Warrenton/Warren County very, very well!! Thank you so much! Thank you for all you do! <3

Yay Warren County and yay, yay Working Landscapes

My favorite non-profit! Y’all do such good work!

😁

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Tomorrow night is First Friday Main Street Poetry, the open mic spoken word revue hosted by Warren County Artists’ Market at Working Landscapes’ Main Street Kitchen! May 3, 7-9 PM, 108 South Main Street, Warrenton: be there. This monthly event is always provides a unique artistic view of life in our community/region.

Here are some pictures from last month! See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago

 

Comment on Facebook

Sharri Riggs Hiller John is in one of these pics

In collaboration with Food Insight Group (FIG), Working Landscapes is pilot testing locally sourced, pasture-raised meat products for schools. Last week we rolled out our first batch of pork meatballs, pulled pork, and beef sliders in four schools across Orange County, where they were well received! The beef is from Firsthand Foods in Durham, and the pork is from Matt Hight in Warren County. We are so appreciative of these suppliers who work hard to provide good quality, ethically raised meat on a daily basis.

We will be taste testing these products in several other schools in the coming weeks, so stay tuned for more pictures and information! See MoreSee Less

4 weeks ago

In collaboration with Food Insight Group (FIG), Working Landscapes is pilot testing locally sourced, pasture-raised meat products for schools.  Last week we rolled out our first batch of pork meatballs, pulled pork, and beef sliders in four schools across Orange County, where they were well received!  The beef is from Firsthand Foods in Durham, and the pork is from Matt Hight in Warren County.  We are so appreciative of these suppliers who work hard to provide good quality, ethically raised meat on a daily basis.

We will be taste testing these products in several other schools in the coming weeks, so stay tuned for more pictures and information!Image attachmentImage attachment

 

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He is doing great work!! Love ❤️

That is awesome

What fun!

We had a great time this weekend at SpringFest 2019 in Warrenton! It was great to see so many people out enjoying the good weather and good times. We had a ball at our booth helping kids of all ages make wildflower seed bombs and plant seeds to take home with them. We’re already looking forward to next year! Special shout out to our extraordinary volunteer, Juniper- she took great care of all of our visitors and made the day easy and fun! See MoreSee Less

4 weeks ago

We had a great time this weekend at SpringFest 2019 in Warrenton! It was great to see so many people out enjoying the good weather and good times. We had a ball at our booth helping kids of all ages make wildflower seed bombs and plant seeds to take home with them. Were already looking forward to next year! Special shout out to our extraordinary volunteer, Juniper- she took great care of all of our visitors and made the day easy and fun!Image attachmentImage attachment

 

Comment on Facebook

Congratulations to your special volunteer!

How awesome!! <3

The 2017 Census of Agriculture was released this week by the Department of Agriculture. The Census of Agriculture takes place every five years and is meant to give the public an idea of where agriculture stands compared to five years earlier. The results are staggering and disheartening; while small and large farms continue to grow, mid-sized family farms are closing and their land is being lost to development, taken out of agricultural usage, or absorbed by larger farms. Almost half of farms aren’t making a profit, while a small percentage of farms (5%) are making over three-quarters (75%) of all sales. Wealthy farmers are growing more wealthy while small farms – and increasingly mid-sized farms – can’t produce enough income to keep the barn doors open. As consolidation continues and as commodity prices remain low, these trends will last into the foreseeable future.

While these trends are alarming, there is still time to reverse them through policy changes, consumer choices, and supply chain connections. The cost of ignoring these trends will be the loss of America’s family farms, replaced by corporate farms that are often unresponsive to community needs, environmental consequences, or animal health. We hope that the 2017 Census of Agriculture is a wake-up call for the agricultural community nationwide and that changes will be made to help growers in the middle. See MoreSee Less

1 month ago

The 2017 Census of Agriculture was released this week by the Department of Agriculture. The Census of Agriculture takes place every five years and is meant to give the public an idea of where agriculture stands compared to five years earlier. The results are staggering and disheartening; while small and large farms continue to grow, mid-sized family farms are closing and their land is being lost to development, taken out of agricultural usage, or absorbed by larger farms. Almost half of farms arent making a profit, while a small percentage of farms (5%) are making over three-quarters (75%) of all sales. Wealthy farmers are growing more wealthy while small farms - and increasingly mid-sized farms - cant produce enough income to keep the barn doors open. As consolidation continues and as commodity prices remain low, these trends will last into the foreseeable future.

While these trends are alarming, there is still time to reverse them through policy changes, consumer choices, and supply chain connections. The cost of ignoring these trends will be the loss of Americas family farms, replaced by corporate farms that are often unresponsive to community needs, environmental consequences, or animal health. We hope that the 2017 Census of Agriculture is a wake-up call for the agricultural community nationwide and that changes will be made to help growers in the middle.

We’re sad to report that Dottie Holland, one of Working Landscapes’ founding board members, passed away on Saturday after a multi-year battle with cancer. Dottie was an anthropology professor at the University of North Carolina who was committed to putting academic research in service of communities’ needs. She was a steadfast supporter of Working Landscapes.

In this picture from 2011, Dottie (speaking, facing the camera) is facilitating a small group discussion in Afton during the Growing Local/Buying Local project. That research and stakeholder engagement project, which involved 170 Warren County residents, set the agenda for the work that Working Landscapes has been pursuing ever since. See MoreSee Less

1 month ago

Were sad to report that Dottie Holland, one of Working Landscapes founding board members, passed away on Saturday after a multi-year battle with cancer.  Dottie was an anthropology professor at the University of North Carolina who was committed to putting academic research in service of communities needs.  She was a steadfast supporter of Working Landscapes.

In this picture from 2011, Dottie (speaking, facing the camera) is facilitating a small group discussion in Afton during the Growing Local/Buying Local project.  That research and stakeholder engagement project, which involved 170 Warren County residents, set the agenda for the work that Working Landscapes has been pursuing ever since.

 

Comment on Facebook

So very sad to hear this. Dottie was my dissertation chair in the late 90s and started me on my career. I owed her a great deal. She will be missed.

So sorry to hear about Dottie. She was an extraordinary woman. Thanks to you at least a lot of us got to meet her.

Sorry for your loss.

My condolences

I’m very sorry to learn this.

Really sad to hear. Dottie was a super human being.🌹🙏🏽

I am so sorry for your loss.

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Last Friday, Alex, Ellen, and Leah had the pleasure of joining students at South Warren Elementary School, NC in Warrenton, NC, in their school garden. Together with students and teachers from 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade classrooms, we weeded 10 garden beds in preparation for spring planting. Before heading outside, students discussed why we weed, and we all shared what we are most excited to grow this year.

We were impressed at how fast these students were able to get their garden weeded- 50 students weeded all of the garden beds in about 30 minutes- if only we could hire them to weed our own gardens! Huge thanks to Principal Dunbar and the other amazing teachers at South Warren who helped. We can’t wait to start planting things once students get back from spring break! See MoreSee Less

1 month ago

 

Comment on Facebook

Great project! Love ❤️

We are thrilled that Honey’s Kitchen Catering, which operates out of the Working Landscapes Main Street Kitchen, was able to cater the Warren County Prom for the second year in a row. Honey’s Kitchen also roped in another kitchen-user for the prom, Wiseman’s Gourmet Popcorn, and served their popcorn as part of the main spread. We heard that Honey’s desserts were a hit and that everyone loved the Wisemans’ cookies and creme popcorn! If you are in need of a high-quality caterer or if you are interested in purchasing popcorn to sell at your business or to serve at an event, please email Alex Borst at alex@workinglandscapesnc.org. You can also reach these businesses directly through their Facebook pages which are linked above.Early start today prepping for the WCHS prom!! #prom2019 Hilda Davis Cordell See MoreSee Less

1 month ago

 

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Jeremy Wiseman

Last Friday, Working Landscapes teamed up with Warren County Cooperative Extension to taste test local sweet potatoes – North Carolina’s state vegetable – in all four of Warren County’s elementary schools. The sweet potatoes were prepared at the Main Street Kitchen in Warrenton and then served to over 1,000 children in elementary school cafeterias across the county. We are excited to continue our partnership with Warren County Schools and Warren County Cooperative Extension into the 2019 growing season with more taste tests to come throughout the spring and summer! See MoreSee Less

1 month ago

Last Friday, Working Landscapes teamed up with Warren County Cooperative Extension to taste test local sweet potatoes - North Carolinas state vegetable - in all four of Warren Countys elementary schools. The sweet potatoes were prepared at the Main Street Kitchen in Warrenton and then served to over 1,000 children in elementary school cafeterias across the county. We are excited to continue our partnership with Warren County Schools and Warren County Cooperative Extension into the 2019 growing season with more taste tests to come throughout the spring and summer!Image attachmentImage attachment

First graders in Ms. Hawkins’ and Ms. Neuling’s class at Northside K-8 were the first to plant in the Northside Community Garden this spring. While learning about plant life cycles, they started seeds for kale, beans, mixed greens, squash, and tomatoes in their classroom. On Wednesday, students got to enjoy some sunshine, learn about beneficial insects in the garden, and transplant some of their plants to their garden bed. We can’t wait to watch them grow! See MoreSee Less

2 months ago

First graders in Ms. Hawkins and Ms. Neulings class at Northside K-8 were the first to plant in the Northside Community Garden this spring. While learning about plant life cycles, they started seeds for kale, beans, mixed greens, squash, and tomatoes in their classroom. On Wednesday, students got to enjoy some sunshine, learn about beneficial insects in the garden, and transplant some of their plants to their garden bed. We cant wait to watch them grow!Image attachmentImage attachment

 

Comment on Facebook

Lance, look at our baby living her best life. 🙂

This week, the Working Landscapes crew had a chance to visit Watauga and Ashe counties, hosted by Dana Powell of Appalachian State Anthropology Department and Jacqui Ignatova of ASU Sustainable Development. Carla and Gabe gave a talk at ASU about WL’s work, and we visited three awesome food initiatives: the High Country Food Hub operated by Blue Ridge Women in Agriculture, FARM (Feed All Regardless of Means) Cafe, and Creeksong Farm. Great to have the opportunity to exchange ideas and experiences with like-minded colleagues in the mountains! See MoreSee Less

2 months ago

Spring weather calls for spring cleaning! The Working Landscapes crew, along with a couple of fantastic volunteers, enjoyed the beautiful sunshine this morning while doing some much needed trail maintenance at Northside K-8. After raking leaves, trimming branches, and cutting down trees that had fallen across the path, the trail finally emerged from its winter hibernation. Check out these before and after photos to see the transformation. See MoreSee Less

2 months ago

Spring weather calls for spring cleaning! The Working Landscapes crew, along with a couple of fantastic volunteers, enjoyed the beautiful sunshine this morning while doing some much needed trail maintenance at Northside K-8. After raking leaves, trimming branches, and cutting down trees that had fallen across the path, the trail finally emerged from its winter hibernation. Check out these before and after photos to see the transformation.Image attachment

 

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Great job!

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